Python, Javascript and UNIX hacker, open source advocate, IRC addict, general badass and traveler
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Temperature Preferences

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There's a supposed Mark Twain quote, "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco." It isn't really by Mark Twain, but I don't know who said it—I just know they've never been to McMurdo Station.
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miohtama
25 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
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4 public comments
zippy72
13 days ago
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Lisbon doesn't get a look in? I'm hurt...
FourSquare, qv
Fidtz
25 days ago
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First xkcd for a while I don't think works. I have been to Riyadh and Hong Kong in the summer. I find it hard to believe anyone who loves one of their climates would even like the other. Dubai+Delhi seems dubious too though I have no first hand experience there.
mooglemoogle
25 days ago
Yeah that’s the thing, heat and humidity don’t necessarily go together. I could definitely see liking hot, dry summers but hating hot, humid ones. I would understand the other way less but that’s just me :)
kazriko
25 days ago
I'm tolerant of hot, dry, but I don't like it. Hot and humid, or even warm and humid just makes me miserable.
ameel
26 days ago
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Awesome. And I love that both Lahore and Karachi are in there!
Melbourne, Australia
angelchrys
26 days ago
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I was wondering if KC would make it and sure enough, it is where it belongs: if you love cold and love heat. I live here and love neither.
Overland Park, KS
infogulch
26 days ago
Yup. I also hate both, but I hate heat more. Looks like I need to move in the direction of New York (on the chart, obviously).

The Global Token Awareness Initiative

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Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 2.24.09 PMFollowing the Canadian version of Token Awareness, today I’m introducing Token Awareness, a global initiative to promote responsible token generation events and token-based models for entrepreneurs, startups, and industry practitioners.

Token Awareness is mostly a curated collection of current and proposed best practices models and self-regulatory projects covering token generation events (TGE) and initial cryptocurrency offerings (ICOs).

Throughout my interactions with the market, it was obvious that several groups around the world expressed the need for self-regulation and some jumped-in to propose projects to show how it would work. My belief is that, not one project, approach or self-regulatory project will dominate nor impose a process on the rest of the market, at least not at this point. Rather, the reality is a collection of such initiatives and projects that will intermingle with one another, and together, they will complete the picture, especially that the local vector is always omnipresent.

The reality is that regulators will regulate, and the market needs to implement sound and responsible practices, which is the focus of this initiative.

On the website you will find:

  • Compliance status from the major regulatory bodies, including significant updates from them
  • A list of best practices projects (current or in-progress), coupled with a reading list
  • A directory of organizations in the following categories: Associations, Regulators, Lawyers,  ICO Service and Data Providers
  • A comprehensive news feed, integrated via my other website OnCoins which aggregates news from 274 sites

 

Over time, content will be updated via a careful and conservative curation of only the most essential and useful resources via the guidance of the Steering Group, and proposed addition that are submitted using this form. Anyone is encouraged to suggest content additions. We realize we have missed content, especially from Asia. The Lawyers list is also developing and needs beefing-up.

To help steer the direction of this initiative, I’m joined by 4 unique individuals whose work I value tremendously. Each one of them is known for their extraordinary contributions: Selva Ozelli, Oliver Bussmann, Juan Llanos and Simon Taylor. Selva, who may not be as well known in the blockchain circles, has been researching the global regulatory environment for cryptocurrencies, with a focus on tax implications. Her latest paper, Regulations Fall on Bitcoin Around the World is excellent. We will add a few more people to this initial list in order to round-up and deepen the global coverage and expert oversight for this initiative.

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miohtama
61 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
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Firefox Nightly enables support for FIDO U2F Security Keys

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This week, Mozilla enabled support for FIDO U2F (Universal 2nd Factor) security keys in the pre-beta release of Firefox, Firefox Nightly. Firefox is the second largest internet browser by user base. In the near future, 80% of the world’s desktop users, including Chrome and Opera users, will benefit from the open authentication standard and YubiKey support out of the box.

When GitHub made support for U2F in 2015, the open source community voted U2F as the most wanted feature in Firefox. We are delighted to now see it happening. Yubico has helped with U2F integration for Firefox and for other platforms and browsers that have or are in the process of making support, as it is critical for taking the YubiKey and U2F unphishable authentication to the global masses.

In today’s world, software installation brings with it not only added complexity for the user, but also the potential risk of malware. Chrome has already enabled millions of websites and services to deploy FIDO U2F seamlessly, mainly through Google and Facebook social login, to help mitigate that. Now with native support for FIDO U2F security keys in Firefox, millions more will benefit from strong, hardware-based two-factor authentication without the need to download or install client software.

Thanks Mozilla for working on increasing security and usability for internet users!

The post Firefox Nightly enables support for FIDO U2F Security Keys appeared first on Yubico.

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miohtama
64 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
iiska
78 days ago
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Oulu, Finland
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Hacker transfers $500,000 from an American bank to a company in Dubai

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An unknown computer hacker has managed to transfer $500,000 (Dh1.8 million) from a bank account in Seattle to a financial services company in Dubai with the intent of investing the money in stock markets.

Court documents revealed that the unknown hacker in the unauthorized transfer gained access to a bank account of an American man in March 2013 and then transferred the amount ($500,000) to the company’s bank account in three installments. Afterwards, an unknown man then went to the bank and claimed he was the American national who owned the account, withdrew some of the profits the money had yield.

Upon discovering the dubious scheme, the American national who owned the account made contact with the financial company in Dubai asking to reclaim the money of which the company refused to do. He made it known to them that he wasn’t the one who approved or sanctioned the transfers, neither did he sign any agreements, nor was he the person who withdrew the cash.

The financial company in Dubai’s decision not to return the money even after acknowledging the receipt which indicated that they received the money, led to the American National’s legal consultant, Hassan Elhais, from Al Rowaad Advocates, to file a civil case against the financial company in attempt to force them to return the money.

Mr. Elhais was able to provide evidence to the civil court in Dubai showing clearly that, his client together with the financial services company in Dubai had no hand in the criminal act. He then proved that his client’s account had experienced a cyber-breach which led to that problem.

That critical revelation in the case compelled the court to assign an auditor on making further investigation into the case which included the source of the money and the various ways of which it was transferred to the financial services company in Dubai.

It was later revealed after the investigation that, the American national indeed was the genuine owner of the bank account and also did not authorize the transfer of $250,000 out of the total $500,000 that was moved.

Further information from the report showed that the other half of the amount, thus another $250,000 was transferred to the company in two installments. An unknown third party involved also used a power of attorney which was allegedly given to him by the American national to withdraw money.

An additional report also stated that, a Cyber crime had occurred and that, the victim is demanding to make a criminal case linked to charges of forgery and impersonation.

When asked if the hacker acted alone or that there were possible hackers involved, Mr. Elhais told the court he could neither confirm nor deny but that more investigations would need to be conducted.

The Dubai based financial services company also presented documents to the court which showed that they made an agreement with the American national including a transfer letter and a withdrawal application for Dh90,000, all bearing his name and signature.

His legal consultant Mr. Elhais once again argued that the documents including the passport and the identification card were everything but the original documents of his client. He proceeded to present original copies of his client’s documents with included his original passport, which clearly was different than that of which the financial company had brought.

All of the submitted documents were then verified and afterward, the Dubai civil court ordered the Dubai based financial services company to repay a sum of $25,000, which was transferred without the authorization of the American national according to court reports.

In addition, the company was also ordered to pay a further 9 percent interest rate on the amount from the date of his legal claim in September 2016.

Nevertheless, the court came to a decision that, the rest of the money was not going to be returned because of lack of evidence to prove that he authorized the transfer of it.

As many laws suggests that, you can fight these cases on the grounds that it is illegal for a person to willfully keep and spend cash in their account that they know was not meant for them. The American national who wasn’t content with the ruling opted to appeal the case but unfortunately, the ruling was sustained.

No criminal case has been filed as of now by the American while the identity of the unknown hacker remains unknown.

The post Hacker transfers $500,000 from an American bank to a company in Dubai appeared first on Deep Dot Web.

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miohtama
78 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
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HR Giger’s biomechanical landscapes

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HR Giger’s biomechanical landscapes

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miohtama
115 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
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Pan Am Helipad in New York City, New York

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A helicopter landing on the roof of the Pan Am building (now Met Life building), 1966.

High atop the 59-story MetLife Building in Midtown Manhattan, a disused landing pad recalls the period when New Yorkers commuted by helicopter. From 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., flocks of roaring choppers once alighted here, to the delight of their passengers and the equal fury of disturbed office workers. The controversial helicopter service ultimately met its end in bloodshed and tragedy.

The downtown helipad operated in two phases, from 1963 to 1965, and later in 1977, when the tower was known the world over as the Pan Am Building.

Pan American World Airways conceived of the helipad as a convenient connection between Grand Central Station (located right next door), and regional Laguardia, John F. Kennedy, and Newark airports. Massive twin-rotor Boeing Vertol helicopters seated 20 and offered an unmatched airport shuttle service.

Travelers could take the elevator to the top floor, grab a drink at the penthouse restaurant, and then whisk off to the airport in a flight that took fewer than 10 minutes. The helicopter rides were surprisingly relatively affordable and were often complimentary when connecting with Pan Am departures. The rides were also a popular sightseeing activity. 

Still, all was not well with the flying taxi service. The constant helicopter traffic predictably ignited a fierce Not-In-My-Backyard reaction from locals who had to endure the thunderous racket. Scores of Op-Eds and an impassioned protest movement put an end to the Pan Am helipad after just two years.

But it wasn't a permanent end. A decade later, Pan Am gave the helipad a second shot using slightly quieter Sikorsky S-61 military helicopters. Once again, helicopters clattered off the Pan Am heliport to the consternation of midtown NIMBYs. The disturbance proved to be brief however, as tragedy struck just three months after its revival.

At 5:35 p.m. on May 16th an inbound chopper from JFK Airport touched down on the Pan Am rooftop. As usual, the ramp went down and passengers began to exit the helicopter. The twin rotors were left spinning as another group waited for their turn to board for a return flight. Suddenly, the six-ton aircraft lurched to its side as the starboard landing gear crumpled and gave way. The spinning rotor blades smashed into the tarmac and exploded, sending a hailstorm of shrapnel flying into the crowd of ticket holders.

Five people were killed and eight wounded in the most violent manner imaginable. Newspaper coverage of the incident was lurid and borderline voyeuristic when recounting the scene and describing the body parts scattered about. 

The May 16th disaster put the helicopter contracting company out of business and spelled the end for the Pan Am helipad. It also put a damper on the idea of urban rooftop landings, which today are only permitted at hospitals in extreme life or death cases.

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miohtama
115 days ago
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Don't helicopter
Helsinki, Finland
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